Being a good listener

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Sometimes I just have to listen to what the fiber tells me to do. I unfurl the braid, loosen the fibers and gently pull a bit from the end. I play with it and twist it this way and that. Then I wait.

This is Wooly Wonka’s “Walden” in mixed BFL and silk, a 60/40 combination, and it told me that it wanted to be spun as finely as possible.

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I’m glad I listened. Of all the yarns I’ve spun so far, I’m proudest of this. Part of that has to do with the yardage (2-ply 600 yards!) and the other part has to do with the fact that I actually learned from my past mistakes. Ever since I spun what was essentially twine, I’ve become more aware of making sure that the twist and diameter of yarn are appropriate for the fiber used. Though BFL is a long wool and shouldn’t be over-twisted, silk can take more twist. I tried to balance the two by using the smallest whorl for the singles to spin as finely as possible, and then I plied using the largest whorl. I wanted the yarn to be thin yet lofty.

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I haven’t decided what project I will be using this for, but for now, I love it as it is.

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4 thoughts on “Being a good listener

    • Thanks!! I used what I normally use for everything–forward short draw. It’s pretty much the only way I know how to draft, though I’ve been trying to branch out. I am a creature of habit so I really have to push myself..!

  1. I draft the same way, if I ever do anything else, it’s on accident. This turned out beautiful! Are the colors all lined up in the two ply? Or just so similar it doesn’t have the barber pole effect?

    • Thank you! There is some barber poling, but it’s not that noticeable. I divided the braid length-wise and drafted across the top edge. Partly because the color shifts are subtle and partly because I spun it finely and thus had large sections of a single color as I drafted across, there wasn’t as much barber poling. This was unintentional. It just happened that way, and I’m loving this unexpected effect.

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