Slow fashion is… really slow

 

We arrived in San Antonio in the summer of 2013 so that V could attend graduate school. I was excited to get away from Portland and from the stresses of work. Though we were only going to be there for a year, we sold a lot of furniture on craigslist, down-sized from a three-bedroom house and moved into a one-bedroom apartment. I was at a crossroads about work and life, and San Antonio offered the chance to get away from the physical and emotional clutter that I felt buried under. I knew no one, and there was something exhilarating that. Just shortly after we arrived, however, Little A had a severe allergic reaction to something she ate. I also found out that someone I had once worked with, a most lovely, kind and good-hearted person, had suddenly died of an undiagnosed brain tumor at the age of 35. Suddenly, the freedom that I had craved made me fearful, exposing a fragility that stress and routine had dulled, and so I turned inward, finding comfort in the tangibility of handwork.

It was there that I started spinning for this sweater, almost three years in the making, spanning time spent in San Antonio, Portland and Washington, DC. I had only just learned to spin the year before and didn’t have any idea of where to buy fiber and what kinds of independent dyers were out there. I was still finding my way through Ravelry and learning the ropes about destashes, fiber clubs and the like. I bought two bags of Portuguese Merino dyed by Hello Yarn through a bulk destash.

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I split each bump into thin strips, and I worked on spinning this, on and off. After a bit, I saw someone destashing another bump of “Silt” and the idea that I might possibly have enough for a sweater began to emerge.

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Fractally spun, I made sure that I did pair the first spin with my last one so that the unevenness of my spinning would somehow even or cancel each other out.  Portuguese merino staples are short, and that made for an uneven rustic yarn with a bouncy crispness.

I finally finished spinning 12 oz this spring. By then, we had already returned to Portland and had also moved twice! All that chaos made it hard to see the project through, and I also found myself with less time for knitting and spinning now that I had returned to full-time work.

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That year in San Antonio had been clarifying. I realized I love my job. I am incredibly lucky I am to be able to do something that is intellectually satisfying and always unpredictable. I’ve also come to grips with aspects of the job that I’m not so good at, and being honest about my limitations and being willing to say “no” has helped scale down the stress tremendously and enabled me to focus more on my writing and research.

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I didn’t know what to knit and I had forgotten to record the yardage. I was going to Washington, DC this summer for work, and I wanted to make sure I had a knitting project to bring along. This cardigan, Praline, by Gudrun Johnston was a last minute impulsive decision. I got gauge and threw the skeins into my suitcase and hoped for the best. I began knitting on the flight to DC, and I worked on it during the evenings, after a long and satisfying day spent at the Library of Congress. I worked on it during the train rides to New York City and Philadelphia, and I finally finished it back at home in Portland.

img_7677So much has happened between when I first started spinning and when I finally sewed those little buttons on.

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Friday Night Light Spins

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I’ve been lax about spinning, knitting, and blogging. Maybe it’s because I haven’t figured out how to balance the two sides of my brain. When I’m working hard, there doesn’t seem much mental space for spinning,  knitting or even blogging. In the past few weeks, however, we have been watching Friday Night Lights after Little A goes to bed, and it’s given me a little time to catch up on some spinning.

When Friday Night Lights first aired, I had dismissed it as a teen drama along the lines of Beverly Hills 90201 meets football. But when my colleagues raved about this show, V and I decided to try it out. Having now lived in Texas, especially near where the show takes place, I feel a personal connection to that cultural landscape in which football is the center of gravity. But, more than that, the writing is really good. We’re only on season two, but I like the compassion with which the characters are presented. On some level, they are high school stereotypes: the jock, the cheerleader, the nerd, etc., but they seem aware that these are precarious roles in the tumultuous high school social order, subject to sudden change.  The two parental figures–the coach and the high school counselor–are married, and despite their strong marriage, their dedication to their jobs means that they sometimes have competing ideas about what is “best” for the students. It’s pretty clever to have a high school counselor as a character. Through her, the show offers commentary and analysis about the characters’ motivations in a way that seems to be a natural feature of the plot and doesn’t sound too contrived or out of place. And, it is very eerie to watch these episodes, which aired in 2006-2007, against the backdrop of the Black Lives Matter movement and the football players’ strike at the University of Missouri to protest against campus racism.

I could go on and on about this show, but suffice to say, this show has increased my spinning output!

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This skein was spun from fiber dyed by Woolgatherings.  They are a regular vendor at my favorite fiber festival, The Flock and Fiber festival in Canby, OR and I bought this 70% oatmeal BFL/30% silk braid last September. I had been waiting a while to spin it and knew that I wanted to make it lace-weight. I didn’t quite expect to get so much–604 meters! I will admit that there were times when I was so over this and wanted it to be done so that I could move onto something else. I think I started spinning this earlier this spring…

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This is my first ever Southern Cross Fibre spin, and yes, it was heavenly. I had signed myself up on the fibre club wait list the spring or summer of 2013, and finally, this summer, I got in!  I must have been needing something different from the lace-weight yarn I had just spun. This corriedale is about 180 meters, and it is squishy and crisp.

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This is probably my new favorite–“Esmerelda” in bond from Southern Cross Fibre. I love the surprise combinations of two and three ply yarns, but right now, there’s nothing more satisfying than plump singles. I am going to be spinning more singles.

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Last but not least, another Nest favorite. This is targhee, and is about 350 meters. I’ve never spun targhee before this and I was amazed but how much it plumped up after I set it. I took this photo a little while ago, otherwise I would have placed it beside the other skeins for scale. It’s only 4 0z, but it’s got bulk.

Handspun Estuary

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Usually, I can’t wait to finish blocking a project, especially one that involves lace. It is so satisfying to watch the lace bloom in water, and for the knit to surprise me with its actual form and pattern. The past few months of living in limbo with our things in storage made it hard for me to block this shawl. I couldn’t find the blocking wires, and frankly, there wasn’t much space to properly lay it out. I finished knitting this Estuary Shawl designed by Tin Can Knits a while ago, and it’s been so long that I don’t remember what size needles I used and when I even started it. I do remember that the beginning wasn’t that intuitive for me and I had to unravel many times. But, look at it now. So totally worth it.

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I fractally spun this yarn, and the fiber comes from Hello Yarn. One of the things about fractal spinning is the way the colors become separated and then repeated. I divided the top into many thin strips and so the color shifts are more frequent.

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This lovely BFL and silk blend is “Slither” and is from the November 2012 club, and I was lucky to have purchased this from someone on Ravelry.  I love BFL and silk blends and spinning them finely to create a thin yarn with a soft haloed sheen. With BFL blends, I’ve learned to relax and let the yarn be loosely plied. It gives a lovely drape that is perfect for shawls.

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Here it is: BLF/Silk “Slither” from Hello Yarn. I love the little bits of light blue hidden in the vortex of this extremely poofy skein.

Kidlet Knit Part II (Or, the Gateway Sweater)

I’ve been lax in posting my recent projects. I blame the end of the term grading madness, the beginning of the term disorientation and the deeply satisfying and lazy holiday break in-between.

This project, which I made for a certain Little L, is made from my go-to-pattern. I’ve now made three of these sweaters, and it was also the first sweater I made that got me back and knee-deep into knitting. This is probably the easiest sweater to make for those looking to dip their toes into knitting garments. It’s a top-down construction, seamless and easily adjustable. Prior to making this, I was knitting scarves and all I knew were purl and knit. But the ease of the garment and the realization that sweaters need not be so intimidating hooked me in. If ever there was sweater that is the equivalent of a gateway drug, this would be it.

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And while comparing this sweet little sweater to banned substances might be a bit inappropriate, especially as I imagine adorable Little L, with her plump rosy cheeks sporting this sweater in the natural beauty of Vancouver Island, my husband V–in looking at our bank account, the neglected state of our home and my constant distracted state as I count my stitches–might find the comparison completely apt.

Now that I’ve taken up spinning, it’s opened up a whole new world of things to learn and obsess about.

Below is my first ever hand-dyed and hand-spun skein, which I used to knit Little L’s sweater. I’ve wanted learn how to dye fiber ever since I started spinning. In fact, that was one of the reasons we drove as quickly as we could to San Antonio last year. I needed to get there in time to take a percentage dyeing class for fabric (which was one of the most informative and amazing classes I’ve taken!). It was a nice bookend to our time in San Antonio that in the last couple of weeks we were there, we drove to Austin so that I could take a fiber dyeing class at Hill Country Weavers, an amazingly stocked yarn store.

This time, I got to just play with color and focus on how to prep my fiber so I don’t felt it. Luckily, I also had some blue-faced leicester top which doesn’t felt as readily. And so I just used whatever color combinations were provided. What I ended up with is the color of a Disney Princess, a connection I didn’t make until we went to Disneyland on our road trip back to Portland.

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Dyeing my own fiber has made me also realize the importance of color placement in a way that I didn’t quite appreciate. As you can see the dyed colors of the top are more distinct, and after I spun the top, the colors became slightly less vibrant. The fact that the yellow was next to the gray/blue resulted in a slightly green tint to the yarn. I am going to be more mindful next time about how I spin as well as what color combinations I will juxtapose against each other.

In any case, I can’t wait to try my hand at more fiber dyeing. Next up for me is working with natural dyes!

 

 

Handspinning Jag

I work in spurts, moving back and forth between intensive knitting and intensive spinning. I’m now in the thick of knitting, but I wanted to share some recent spins that I’m now furiously transforming into sweaters and hats. IMG_4631

IMG_4635This kaleidoscope of pinks, oranges, and purples is from Two If By Hand in “Indian Summer.”  It is a mix of merino, cashmere and nylon, and it is probably one of my favorite color combinations at the moment. It is being turned into a Kina baby sweater right now, and it is gloriously stretchy and strong. While I was plying this into a two-ply, I nearly cut my finger because the yarn was so thin and strong. This would have made decadent socks because of the hard-wearing nylon and the cashmere. This skein is 268 meters.

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IMG_4644Nest Fibers never disappoint. Gorgeous colors and fabulous prep, which make for really enjoyable spinning. This is 2-ply organic polwarth skein is “Fernweh” from the October 2014 installment of the Nest Fiber Club. It is a worsted weight yarn that I’m going to make into a hat for V. He doesn’t get a lot of handspun because I’m usually drawn to colors that he doesn’t feel comfortable sporting up at the Veterans Hospital where he works, and so the moment I saw this fiber in the mail, I knew it was going to be for him. (As an aside, he wants me to state that he has no problems with his masculinity and to let y’all know that he recently wore one of my purple cowls to work. However, he did have to field a lot of questions about “cowls” and what they were.)

IMG_4661These monster skeins are from Blue Moon Fiber Art Sock Sheep to Shoe Kit, a large 8.5 oz bag of super wash merino. I got this kit from the woman who sold me her Matchless on craigslist back in the spring of 2013. I’ve been pretty much working on this ever since! The packaging didn’t state what color way this is, but I think it is “Twinkle Twinkle Little Vampire.” I decided to spin this fiber into a 3-ply but I spun each single so thinly that I was overwhelmed. It hibernated for a long while. Now that I’m finished, it is really satisfying to just grab these skeins and squeeze them!

IMG_4668This largest skein is 555 meters. I ran out of space on my bobbin and had to ply onto another bobbin. The smaller skein of regular 3-ply is 274 meters. I still had quite a bit left over on my two other bobbins (this was before I started weighing my fiber), and so I decided to chain-ply the rest. IMG_4665This resulting chain-ply is 214 meters. I love how different the effects are, and I’m hoping that the beauty of this fiber will help me overcome my dislike of sock knitting.

IMG_4658This last skein is from Three Fates Yarn, which is based out of Salem, OR. I purchased this super wash merino at the Flock and Fiber Festival this past fall though I know that they also sell Three Fates Yarn at Twisted, my favorite yarn store.  I loved the cheerful color combination and was looking for something I could spin to donate to Little A’s school. A lot of the children in her class are learning to knit, and I wanted them to be able to work with fiber that had energy and life. This two-ply is 174 meters.

Knitting for kidlets (the first of many…)

Last year, I didn’t get very far with my Christmas knitting. Two measly handspun hats were all I managed.  I’m again behind, but this time it’s for a good reason: Babies. And tons of them. I don’t know what was going on last fall, but I’m surrounded by little babes right now. And all of them too cute to go through life without handspun.

Work has been intense, and so I’ve been spinning and knitting when I can–spinning during late night episodes of The West Wing on Netflix (yes, I’m not just behind on my Christmas knitting) and knitting while Little A takes swimming lessons. Needless to say, it’s been a slow-going process.  I’m knitting larger sizes so that the little tykes can still fit them by the time I am done. This little cardigan is sized for a twelve-month old.

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I’ve admired this pattern, Kina, for ages. It’s darling and simple, and it is a great pattern to show off colorful handspun yarn. The gathering at the collar give this sweater some visual interest, but it is a very simple top down sweater. There is also the option of making this with long sleeves. I think more designers out there should design for these kinds of colorfully dyed fibers, patterns that allow these handspun yarns to shine through. I’m still on the lookout for more hat patterns for my Christmas knitting that would work well with the barber pole color shifts of my handspun yarn.

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I love how the color transitions turned out. I divided the long strip in half cross-wise and then divided each half into eight thin strips. I did it mainly to speed up my spinning as I only just realized that when I spin across a wide top, it is a much slower process, especially if you’re like me and use the short forward drafting method.

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You can see the effects of these thin strips then plied together, creating thin bands of color that radiate from the collar. The larger bands of pink and green at the body are completely accidental, and I like the slight pattern shift because it keeps the sweater from being too visually busy. There are three little button holes at the top, but I was too excited to share and couldn’t wait for buttons. I think little pearly off-white ones would really look great here but I haven’t had time to shop.

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The superwash merino fiber is dyed by Ceylan of Two If By Hand, and the color is “Relationship Agreement.” I wish I had taken a photo of this fiber before I spun it up. I worried that the colors were a bit too dark for a baby sweater but I think it really turned out well.  This is a two-ply and I managed to get 375 meters out of this 4 oz bump.

Little A has already named this little sweater “Jummit” and she likes to cuddle it as if it were a doll. There is something too adorable for words about teeny sweaters. I am going to have to spin and knit one for Little A so that she can have her own little Jummit.

Plied at last

In preparation for our move back to Portland, I felt compelled to spin as much fiber as I could. You know, uh, cuz fiber is so heavy.

I didn’t ply my singles, however, because I wanted to let the singles relax a bit before plying them together. So when we got home, I found myself plying like a madwoman. We haven’t completely unpacked yet so I don’t have all my notes on these recent spins. Oh well.

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Nest Fiber Club, “Primavera” in superwash merino. Chain-plied.

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This is Hello Yarn’s “Slither” in BFL/silk. This was spun fractally and loosely plied.

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This is from A Verb for Keeping Warm in “Octotillo.” One piece was superfine merino, and the other was 80% merino/20% silk. We stopped off at this store in Oakland on our way home. Most of it is a two-ply, and the grapey purple is the leftover, which I then chain-plied. More details about our visit to this awesome store later.